Artificial Reefs

Sea shell, Green Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Sea shell, Green Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Page under construction June 2015. Reef balls, biorock etc.

All being well, some ideas to come (it may be months) for making relatively easy and small versions of reef balls (see http://www.reefball.org).

Some artificial reefs

Reef ball. Photo: Reefball.org.

Reef ball – a large man made  concrete “Igloo” with holes in it. Starting to look like a natural bommie. Photo: Reefball.org.

*

Two pieces of cement/mortar which I made almost 20 years ago using beach sand derived from coral. The mixture worked well, and is still working well after all this time. The material is very similar to the naturally formed "cement rock" on which they are sitting. Photo taken at Green Island.

Two pieces of cement/mortar which I made almost 20 years ago using beach sand derived from coral. The mixture worked well, and is still working well after all this time. The material is very similar to the naturally formed “cement rock” on which they are sitting. Photo taken at Green Island.

*

Pipes providing habitat for fish and other animals, and a substrate on which coral, sponges, seaweeds, etc. can grow. Photo: Marinegiscenter.dmcr.go.th.org.

Pipes providing shelter/ habitat for fish, crustacea and other animals, and a substrate on which coral, sponges, molluscs, seaweeds, etc. can grow. Photo: Marinegiscenter.dmcr.go.th.org.

*

Concrete bricks providing habitat and substrate. Photo: Nature.org.

Concrete bricks providing habitat/shelter and substrate (coral nursery in this case). Photo: Nature.org.

*

Concrete bricks. Photo: Reefresilience.org.

Concrete bricks – holes/tunnels and surfaces on which coral can grow. Photo: Reefresilience.org.

*

Artificial reef. Photo: Wikimedia.

Artificial reef. Photo: Wikimedia.

*

Railway carriages used to form artificial reefs, New York, USA. Photo: nysubway.dnr.sc.gov.

Railway carriages used to form artificial reefs, New York, USA. Photo: nysubway.dnr.sc.gov.

*

Coral growing on a metal frame. Photo: savecoralreefs.org.

Coral growing on a metal frame. Photo: savecoralreefs.org.

*

Articial reefs which look close to natural, even before anything is growing on them. Varying the sizes and distances between the reefs would also add to a natural look. Photo: philstar.com.

Articial reefs which look close to natural, even before anything is growing on them. Varying the sizes and distances between the reefs would also contribute  to a more natural look. Photo: philstar.com.

*

Natural regeneration of coral on a concrete pylon, Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

Natural regeneration of coral on a concrete pylon, exposed to the air during an unusually low tide. Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

*

Close up.

Close up.

*

Naturally regenerating coral on a concrete pylon.

Naturally regenerating coral on a concrete pylon.

*

Coral growing on a concrete pylon.

Coral growing on a concrete pylon. Photo: David Clode.

*

Coral growing on manmade concrete.

Coral growing on manmade concrete.

*

Soft coral growing on a concrete pylon.

Soft coral growing on a concrete pylon, exposed during a very low tide.

*

Oysters growning on a painted steel pylon at Green Island. Even if you don't want it, life will even find a foothold on the least desirable surfaces, including the hulls of boats.

Oysters growning on a painted steel pylon at Green Island. Even if you don’t want it, life will even find a foothold on the least desirable surfaces, including the hulls of boats.

*

Just a few interesting photos:

Soft coral exposed during a very low tide. the coral will survive and recover when the tide comes in. Green Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Soft coral exposed during a very low tide. It will survive and recover when the tide comes in. Green Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

*

Soft coral. Photo: David Clode.

Soft coral at very low tide. Approx. 1.5 meters in diameter. Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

*

Soft coral close up. Photo: David Clode.

Soft coral close up. Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

*

Exposed coral reef at low tide, Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

Exposed coral reef at low tide, Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

*

Beach composed of broken coral, Fitzroy Island, Great Barrier Reef Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Beach composed of broken coral, Fitzroy Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

*

Seastar (star fish) about 30 cm or 12 inches in diameter. Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

Sea star (star fish) about 30 cm or 12 inches in diameter in sea grass beds, Green Island. Photo: David Clode.

*

Sea shell, Green Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Sea shell, Green Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

*

Under construction.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s