Mangrove Reforestation

Mangrove seeds/propagules washed up on a beach in Cairns Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Mangrove reforestation. Under construction.

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Mangrove reforestation is one of the easiest types of reforestation, which can be started very simply with the propagules of Rhizophora spp., for example, with more species added later.

Considering their importance to broader ecosystems, including their role as fish breeding and hatching sites, where many species of fish grow up in the mangroves and then migrate out to sea and to coral reefs, reforesting mangroves provides major environmental and economic benefits for a minimum of effort. Mangrove reforestation also provides an opportunity for effective carbon storage. A huge return on a minimal investment.

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Stilt roots in a mangrove forest (India?). Photo: Shaueel Persadee on Unsplash.com.

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Juvenile Batfish in a simulated mangrove tank at the Cairns Aquarium. Many species of fish breed in mangroves, with the young fish growing up in the mangroves, and then migrating out to reefs, and returning to mangroves as adults to breed again. Photo: David Clode.

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Mangrove trees growing in the sea at high tide, Cape Tribulation.

Mangrove trees growing in the sea. High tide, Cape Tribulation, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

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Floating Rhizophora propagule. Photo: David Clode.

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A mangrove crab. Saltwater Lake, Cairns.

A mangrove crab. Saltwater Lake, Cairns, Australia.

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A Mud Crab photographed at the Cairns Aquarium. Photo: David Clode.

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Mangrove forest. Cairns, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Mangrove forest. Cairns, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

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Mangrove Monitor. Photographed at the Cairns Aquarium by David Clode.

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Archerfish at the Cairns Aquarium, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

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Archerfish at the Cairns Aquarium. Photo: David Clode.

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Mangroves, Trinity Bay, Cairns, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

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The Sundarbans, on the border of India and Bangladesh, are the largest area of mangrove forest in the world. They are also one of the last refuges for tigers. Photo: Donnie Ray Crisp on Unsplash.com.

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Mangroves are an important habitat for Estuarine and other species of crocodiles. Photo: David Clode.

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Mangrove seeds washed up on a beach. Photo: David Clode

Mangrove seeds washed up on a beach. Cairns, Australia. Photo: David Clode

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Reference

Clough, B, F. (Ed). (1979). Mangrove Ecosystems in Australia. Structure, function and management. Proceedings of the Australian National Mangroves Workshop Australian Institute of Marine Science. Australian National University Press.

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